diamondsrings23

diamondsrings23
tedx:

During a workshop on creating a TEDx manifesto, attendees face the difficulty of defining something so ineffable: “What makes the TEDx community so strong is the shared gut understanding that’s already there, about the manifesto, about what TEDx is.” They concluded with five items, including this mission statement: “Our mission is to spread ideas that will inspire people to improve society.”

While discussing TEDx tools for the developing world, Kelo Kubu from TEDxSoweto points out that high production value, like that at TED, does not always translate across cultures. A luxurious venue or too smooth an operation can actually work against the mission in some communities; people become distracted from the ideas and instead focus on the “WOW,” or wonder how they can exploit the host organization. As Kelo says, “Don’t bring things into the community that don’t fit there! When you bring people into an environment where they don’t feel they belong, they don’t feel comfortable enough to share.” Sometimes plastic chairs do it best.

In a workshop on hosting an event in a “complicated region,” Yahay Alabdeli from TEDxBaghdad reflects on the precariousness of cooperating with a government sponsor in a country like Iraq. He jokes (with seriousness), “Get EVERYTHING on paper. No ‘inshallah’” — before urging attendees of the workshop to really ask themselves if they want to hold a TEDx event in their native countries, where they may be perceived in the wrong light. As TEDxAnnaba’s Mehdi Dib puts it, “Here, we are perceived as thinkers; but in our countries, we are perceived as activists.”

tedx:

During a workshop on creating a TEDx manifesto, attendees face the difficulty of defining something so ineffable: “What makes the TEDx community so strong is the shared gut understanding that’s already there, about the manifesto, about what TEDx is.” They concluded with five items, including this mission statement: “Our mission is to spread ideas that will inspire people to improve society.”

TEDxSummit_23692_D81_2656_1920

While discussing TEDx tools for the developing world, Kelo Kubu from TEDxSoweto points out that high production value, like that at TED, does not always translate across cultures. A luxurious venue or too smooth an operation can actually work against the mission in some communities; people become distracted from the ideas and instead focus on the “WOW,” or wonder how they can exploit the host organization. As Kelo says, “Don’t bring things into the community that don’t fit there! When you bring people into an environment where they don’t feel they belong, they don’t feel comfortable enough to share.” Sometimes plastic chairs do it best.

TEDxSummit_23900_D81_2864_1920

In a workshop on hosting an event in a “complicated region,” Yahay Alabdeli from TEDxBaghdad reflects on the precariousness of cooperating with a government sponsor in a country like Iraq. He jokes (with seriousness), “Get EVERYTHING on paper. No ‘inshallah’” — before urging attendees of the workshop to really ask themselves if they want to hold a TEDx event in their native countries, where they may be perceived in the wrong light. As TEDxAnnaba’s Mehdi Dib puts it, “Here, we are perceived as thinkers; but in our countries, we are perceived as activists.”

Snapguide Gets Pinterest Integration

parislemon:

This is a smart way to integrate with Pinterest while they work on a proper API — it’s similar to how some apps passed photos to Instagram before they had a proper mobile write API (which is still limited to Hipstamatic, I believe). 

Here’s a quick video showing how it works.

I get the feeling that Pinterest write API access for mobile will be huge. Huge as in, a lot of startups are going to integrate it before they worry about something like Google+. It will be Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest.

Snapguide parent Heavy Bits is a CrunchFund portfolio company. Mainly because they’re awesome

irondavy:

Yesterday’s post originally had a bunch of silly trivia about NASA and SETI mixed in. It was a mess, and the post is much better without it. But, I love SETI, so I thought I’d share some of that random junk:
Do you know about the Arecibo message? It’s a radio signal that was sent out to space, on the off chance that extraterrestrials were/are listening. Encoded are key math and science figures, to demonstrate our intelligence. It also contains the above map of our solar system, minus the coloring (that was added by me). As a pixel art nerd, this is both more primitive and more powerful than any other pixel drawing I can think of.
It’s not a modern idea: Carl Friedrich Gauss wanted to plant trees in a pattern that illustrated the Pythagorean theorem, in case anyone checked us out from above. Joseph Johann Littrow wanted to dig canals in geometric patterns, fill them with kerosene, and set it on fire.
Anyway, the guy that created the Arecibo message, Frank Drake, is also the mind behind the Drake equation, which attempts to estimate the number of detectable ET civilizations. It’s kinda bogus, but kinda not. It does raise an earnest question: if the odds of alien intelligence are so high, why haven’t they done what we’ve done: shoot sweet pixel art out into space for detection by other life?
There are a lot of theories, but one that science fiction loves is the zoo hypothesis: that ET life are simply watching and waiting. Two of my favorite pieces of science fiction, 2001 and Star Trek, both share this as their central premise. In 2001, the triggering event of ET intervention is man’s arrival to the moon. In Star Trek, the Vulcan race came to Earth only after we discovered the technology for interstellar travel. The Federation itself continued this nonintervention policy.
It won’t surprise you to learn that Carl Sagan had his hand in much of the above, and his depiction of all this, Contact, is one of my favorite movies, even though it really is super bad in most ways.
Bonus: The New York Times, in 1835, called reports of bat-men living on the moon “probable and possible.”

irondavy:

Yesterday’s post originally had a bunch of silly trivia about NASA and SETI mixed in. It was a mess, and the post is much better without it. But, I love SETI, so I thought I’d share some of that random junk:

Do you know about the Arecibo message? It’s a radio signal that was sent out to space, on the off chance that extraterrestrials were/are listening. Encoded are key math and science figures, to demonstrate our intelligence. It also contains the above map of our solar system, minus the coloring (that was added by me). As a pixel art nerd, this is both more primitive and more powerful than any other pixel drawing I can think of.

It’s not a modern idea: Carl Friedrich Gauss wanted to plant trees in a pattern that illustrated the Pythagorean theorem, in case anyone checked us out from above. Joseph Johann Littrow wanted to dig canals in geometric patterns, fill them with kerosene, and set it on fire.

Anyway, the guy that created the Arecibo message, Frank Drake, is also the mind behind the Drake equation, which attempts to estimate the number of detectable ET civilizations. It’s kinda bogus, but kinda not. It does raise an earnest question: if the odds of alien intelligence are so high, why haven’t they done what we’ve done: shoot sweet pixel art out into space for detection by other life?

There are a lot of theories, but one that science fiction loves is the zoo hypothesis: that ET life are simply watching and waiting. Two of my favorite pieces of science fiction, 2001 and Star Trek, both share this as their central premise. In 2001, the triggering event of ET intervention is man’s arrival to the moon. In Star Trek, the Vulcan race came to Earth only after we discovered the technology for interstellar travel. The Federation itself continued this nonintervention policy.

It won’t surprise you to learn that Carl Sagan had his hand in much of the above, and his depiction of all this, Contact, is one of my favorite movies, even though it really is super bad in most ways.

Bonus: The New York Times, in 1835, called reports of bat-men living on the moon “probable and possible.”

lookslikescience:

Benilton Carvalho is a PhD in Biostatistics, who develops statistical methodologies and high-performance computational tools for the analysis of high-throughput genomic data.

lookslikescience:

Benilton Carvalho is a PhD in Biostatistics, who develops statistical methodologies and high-performance computational tools for the analysis of high-throughput genomic data.